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Heaven Falls - The Complete Series Supernatural Romance - cover

Heaven Falls - The Complete Series Supernatural Romance

Third Cousins, Jaime Nicholls

Publisher: Third Cousins

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Summary

Book 1: Alice had no idea why she was in heaven. Her guide, Josie, isn't much help, either. She seems to be enjoying the fact that Alice is clueless about her death and the life that came before it. As Alice’s heaven expands around her, she discovers that there might be somebody in heaven who can fill in the blanks in her memories, but when they are unwilling to help, she finds herself being pushed to dangerous measures to discover the person she used to be. Book 2: Alice has been given the chance of a lifetime. She’s been sent back in time to live out the last week of her life. She’s relieved to find that her questions about her past are finally being answered, but as the days pass, she starts to realize that finding out the truth hasn't brought her any peace. When the day of her death arrives she’s relieved to think that she will soon be returning to heaven, but when her death passes and she’s still on earth, she realizes that things aren't going to be as straightforward as she had thought. Book 3: Alice is stuck on earth and there’s no way back to heaven. She finds herself floating back to her college campus and when her friend Milly doesn’t seem to care that she’s dead, she begins to lose her sanity. When a resident ghost at the college warns her about the path of revenge she is taking, it becomes startlingly obvious that Alice may already be too far gone. But when a familiar face shows up from heaven, Alice starts to realize just how far she has fallen. The question is, though, is it already too late for her? Has she already fallen too far to be saved?

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