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Goma - Stories of Strength and Sorrow from Eastern Congo - cover

Goma - Stories of Strength and Sorrow from Eastern Congo

Theodore Trefon, Noël Kabuyaya

Publisher: Zed Books

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Summary

An engaging and unconventional portrait of Goma based around personal narrativesDraws on a wealth of original interview material and oral
testimonies giving voice to local CongoleseGoma
is a major hub for aid workers. This will be essential reading for scholars and
NGO workers interested in eastern DRCCo-written by a respected European-based scholar and a Congolese researcher with extensive local networks

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