Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
Theodore Roosevelt's Letters to His Children - Touching and Emotional Correspondence of the Former President with Alice Theodore III Kermit Ethel Archibald and Quentin From Their Early Childhood Until Their Adulthood - cover

Theodore Roosevelt's Letters to His Children - Touching and Emotional Correspondence of the Former President with Alice Theodore III Kermit Ethel Archibald and Quentin From Their Early Childhood Until Their Adulthood

Theodore Roosevelt

Publisher: Madison & Adams Press

  • 0
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

Most of the letters in this book were written by Theodore Roosevelt to his children during a period of more than twenty years. A few others are included which he wrote to friends or relatives about the children. He began to write to them in their early childhood, and continued to do so regularly till they reached maturity. Whenever he was separated from them, in the Spanish War, or on a hunting trip, or because they were at school, he sent them these messages of constant thought and love, for they were never for a moment out of his mind and heart. Long before they were able to read he sent them what they called "picture letters," with crude drawings of his own illustrations of the written text, drawings precisely adapted to the childish imagination and intelligence. That the little recipients cherished these delightful missives is shown by the tender care with which they preserved them from destruction. They are in good condition after many years of loving usage. A few of them are reproduced on these pages—written at different periods as each new child appeared in the household.

Who read this book also read:

  • Suits: A Woman on Wall Street - cover

    Suits: A Woman on Wall Street

    Nina Godiwalla

    • 1
    • 9
    • 0
    No class can prepare anyone for a career on Wall Street.  
    While others in Nina Godiwalla's Persian-Indian immigrant community were content to fulfill their parents'dreams, Nina's fierce ambition pulled her from Houston to New York to become a banker. The rarified taste of power left her hungry for more.   
     
    Showered with Broadway tickets and ferried around in sleek black town cars, Morgan Stanley recruits led a fast and flashy lifestyle, but at a steep cost. In a world where strip clubs took the place of conference rooms, Nina was driven to fit the mold of her fellow recruits: wealthy, white, and male. But would she have to lose her Southern accent and suppress her family's heritage to prove her worth on the trading floor?  Nina Godiwalla offers a behind-the-scenes look at the recklessness that ruled Wall Street during the dot-com boom days. 
    Show book
  • It's My Party - A Memoir - cover

    It's My Party - A Memoir

    Jeannette Watson

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    Born into a celebrity family (her father was Watson's son, who turned the company into the powerhouse it still is today, and her mother, Olive, had dated Howard Hughes and John F. Kennedy), Jeannette Watson's larger-than-life family hid a number of secrets. Behind a facade of order and glamour, Tom Watson often experienced dark moods; his depression was something he passed on to his daughter. Jeannette felt she could never measure up to her mother-a legendary beauty-and kept her nose buried in books. 
    Through her years as a debutante, then young wife and mother, Watson kept her feelings under wraps until she had a mental breakdown. As part of her fight to heal herself, she left her husband, taking their son and moving to New York City to experience its heady 1970s freedoms. She opened the legendary Upper East Side bookstore Books & Co., which became a gathering place for literati. Her personal life soared once more when she met her second husband, Alex Sanger, grandson of Planned Parenthood's founder, with whom she had two more sons. After a long and fulfilling run, the bookstore closed and Watson found her way down a new path to become a spiritual healer. 
    It's My Party is a portrait of another era, a guide to dealing with depression, and one woman's deep effort to understand herself.
    Show book
  • Sharp - A Memoir - cover

    Sharp - A Memoir

    David Fitzpatrick

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    David Fitzpatrick’s Sharp is an extraordinary memoir—a fascinating, disturbing look into the mind of a man who, in his early 20s, began cutting himself due to a severe mental illness. A beautifully written treatment of a powerful subject, Fitzpatrick—whose symptoms included extreme depression and self-mutilation—writes movingly and honestly about his affliction and inspires readers with his courage, joining the literary ranks of Terri Cheney (Manic), Augusten Burroughs (Running with Scissors), Marya Hornbacher (Wasted), and Susanna Kaysen (Girl, Interrupted). 
    “A harrowing journey from self-destructive psychosis to a cautious re-emergence into the flickering sunshine of the sane world….Fitzpatrick writes about mental illness with the unsparing intensity of Sylvia Plath and Anne Sexton but also with the hard-won self-knowledge of William Styron, Kay Jamison, and other chroniclers of disease, recovery, and management…. A must read, remarkably told.”—Wally Lamb, author of I Know This Much is True
    Show book
  • Whipping Boy - The Forty-Year Search for My Twelve-Year-Old Bully - cover

    Whipping Boy - The Forty-Year...

    Allen Kurzweil

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Winner of the Edgar® Award for Best Fact Crime 
    The true account of one boy’s lifelong search for his boarding-school bully. 
    Equal parts childhood memoir and literary thriller, Whipping Boy chronicles prize-winning author Allen Kurzweil’s search for his twelve-year-old nemesis, a bully named Cesar Augustus. The obsessive inquiry, which spans some forty years, takes Kurzweil all over the world, from a Swiss boarding school (where he endures horrifying cruelty) to the slums of Manila, from the Park Avenue boardroom of the world’s largest law firm to a federal prison camp in Southern California. 
    While hunting down his tormentor, Kurzweil encounters an improbable cast of characters that includes an elocution teacher with ill-fitting dentures, a gang of faux royal swindlers, a crime investigator “with paper in his blood,” and a  onocled grand master of the Knights of Malta. Yet for all its global exoticism and comic exuberance, Kurzweil’s riveting account is, at its core, a heartfelt and suspenseful narrative about the “parallel lives” of a victim and his abuser. 
    A scrupulously researched work of nonfiction that renders a childhood menace into an unlikely muse, Whipping Boy is much more than a tale of karmic retribution; it is a poignant meditation on loss, memory, and mourning, a surreal odyssey born out of suffering, nourished by rancor, tempered by wit, and resolved, unexpectedly, in a breathtaking act of personal courage. 
    Whipping Boy features two 8-page black-and-white photo inserts and  83 images throughout.
    Show book
  • My Experiments with Truth - An Autobiography - cover

    My Experiments with Truth - An...

    Mahatma Gandhi

    • 1
    • 9
    • 0
    The Story of My Experiments with Truth, the autobiography of Mahatma Gandhi, is a very popular and influential book. It covers the period from his birth (1869) to the year 1921, describing his childhood, his school days, his early marriage, his journeys abroad, his legal studies and practise.
    The book is more about the experiments of Gandhi with truth and his Satyagraha movement, which literally means demanding the truth and nothing else. This is the very idea that helped him to fight against racism, violence and colonialism. All of this eventually helped him to achieve his dream of an independent India.
    Gandhi mentions his numerous experiments, starting from his elocution training to putting an end to his fear and shyness towards public speaking. His instances of attending singing classes and shaking a leg on the dance floor are well-described. He was a staunch vegetarian, fasted regularly and walked 10 miles daily. He studied comparative religion greatly and was a devote Hindu, but showed great respect for all religions. Gandhi didn't shy away from accepting his own mistakes and displayed commendable patience and fortitude in his personal life. 
    About the Author:
    Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, was the prominent figure in the freedom struggle in India from the British rule. He is also known as the 'The Father of the Nation', in India.
    The author has written a number of books and some of them include Character & Nation Building, India of My Dreams, and All Men are Brothers.
    The author was born on the 2nd of October, 1869, in Porbandar, Gujarat. In the year 1942, he played a key role in launching the Quit India movement, which was intended at forcing the British to leave the nation. As a result of launching this movement, he was thrown in prison and remained there for several years, due to other political offenses allegedly committed by him. At all times, he practised satyagraha, which is the teaching of non-violence. As the British rule ended, he was saddened by India's partition, and tried his best to bring peace among the Sikhs and Muslims. On the 30th of January, 1948, Mahatma Gandhi was shot dead by a Hindu nationalist, for allegedly being highly concerned about the nation's Muslim population.
    Show book
  • With Wellington's Outposts - cover

    With Wellington's Outposts

    Andrew Bamford

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The author has done a quite outstanding job of editing and footnoting this rare memoir . . . this will be of genuine interest to the Peninsular War historian or enthusiast.' Philip Haythornthwaite**John Vandeleur's letters home to his mother are a lively and engaging account of active service during the Napoleonic Wars, recounting everything from day-to-day life on campaign to the experience of pitched battle at Vitoria and Waterloo. **As first a light infantryman and then a light cavalryman, Vandeleur was frequently on the outposts of Wellington's forces, in frequent contact with the French and often obliged to live a rough-and-ready lifestyle as a result. The conditions that he endured, and the camaraderie that sustained him, are vividly recounted in this fascinating collection - previously only available in an extremely rare private publication over a century ago. **Expertly edited and enhanced with contemporary documents and commentary by Andrew Bamford, this is an outstanding contribution to our understanding of the Peninsular War and Waterloo campaign.
    Show book