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German Fiction - Theodor Fontane Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Gottfried Keller and Theodor Storm - cover

German Fiction - Theodor Fontane Johann Wolfgang von Goethe Gottfried Keller and Theodor Storm

Theodor Storm, Theodor Fontane, Gottfried Keller, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Publisher: anboco

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Summary

The Sorrows Of Werther (J. W. VON GOETHE) - Criticism And Interpretation by Thomas Carlyle
The Banner Of The Upright Seven (GOTTFRIED KELLER) - Criticisms And Interpretations by John Firman Coar and Calvin Thomas
The Rider On The White Horse (THEODOR STORM) - Criticism And Interpretation by Adolf Stern
Trials and Tribulations (THEODOR FONTANE - Criticisms And Interpretations by Richard M. Meyer and S. C. De Soissons

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