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The Peasants' Revolting Crimes - cover

The Peasants' Revolting Crimes

Terry Deary

Publisher: Pen & Sword History

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Summary

The bestselling author of Horrible Histories “lays bare the kind of crimes peasants would be committing throughout modern history . . . fascinating!” —Books Monthly   Popular history writer Terry Deary takes us on a light-hearted and often humorous romp through the centuries with Mr. & Mrs. Peasant, recounting foul and dastardly deeds committed by the underclasses, as well as the punishments meted out by those on the “right side” of the law.   Discover tales of arsonists and axe-wielders, grave robbers and garroters, poisoners and prostitutes. Delve into the dark histories of beggars, swindlers, forgers, sheep rustlers and a whole host of other felons from the lower ranks of society who have veered off the straight and narrow. There are stories of highwaymen and hooligans, violent gangs, clashing clans and the witch trials that shocked a nation. Learn too about the impoverished workers who raised a riot opposing crippling taxes and draconian laws, as well as the strikers and machine-smashers who thumped out their grievances against new technologies that threatened their livelihoods.   This entertaining book is packed full of revolting acts and acts of revolt, revealing how ordinary folk—from nasty Normans to present-day lawbreakers—have left an extraordinary trail of criminality behind them. The often gruesome penalties exacted in retribution reveal a great deal about some of the most fascinating eras of British history.   “It will tickle your funny bone for hours on end, so much so you will never put it down! In conclusion, this is a great book for children and adults alike. It is not only comedy but it also used 100% historically accurate.” —History . . . The Interesting Bits!

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