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How Do They Work? Telescopes Electric Motors Drones and Race Cars | Technology Book for Kids Junior Scholars Edition | Children's How Things Work Books - cover

How Do They Work? Telescopes Electric Motors Drones and Race Cars | Technology Book for Kids Junior Scholars Edition | Children's How Things Work Books

Tech Tron

Publisher: Tech Tron

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Summary

Learn the inner workings of technology you see everyday. This ebook discusses how telescopes, electric motors, drones and race cards work. Who invented them and what were the developments over the years? How do they do what they do? What is the science behind them? Know the answers and more today. Start reading.

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