A world full of adventures is waiting for you!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Dick Waterman - A Life in Blues - cover

Dick Waterman - A Life in Blues

Tammy L. Turner

Publisher: University Press of Mississippi

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Growing up in an affluent Jewish family in Plymouth, Massachusetts, Dick Waterman (b. 1935) was a shy, stuttering boy living a world away from the Mississippi Delta. Though he never heard blues music at home, he became one of the most influential figures in blues of the twentieth century. A close proximity to Greenwich Village in the 1960s fueled Waterman's growing interest in folk music and led to an unlikely trip that resulted in the rediscovery of Delta blues artist Son House in 1964. Waterman began efforts to revive House’s music career and soon became his manager. He subsequently founded Avalon Productions, the first management agency focused on representing black blues musicians. In addition to booking and managing, he worked tirelessly to protect his clients from exploitation, demanded competitive compensation, and fought for royalties due them. During his career, Waterman befriended and worked with numerous musicians, including such luminaries as B. B. King, Buddy Guy, Taj Mahal, and Eric Clapton. During the early years of his career, he documented the work of scores of musicians through his photography and gained fame as a blues photographer. This authorized biography is the crescendo of years of original research as well as extensive interviews conducted with Waterman and those who knew and worked with him.

Other books that might interest you

  • The Canadians - A Collection of Three Epic Novels - cover

    The Canadians - A Collection of...

    Clare Flynn

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    An epic drama of war and its impact on ordinary people – not only while it's happening, but for the years to follow. 
     
    These three full-length novels follow the fortunes of Jim Armstrong, a young Canadian soldier in the Second World War, and those of the women he who impact his life. Gwen, a British housewife, afraid to confront her feelings, Joan and Ethel, two young women Jim meets in an English pub, and Alice, his sister-in-law and the woman who broke his heart.
     
    From a small seaside town in the firing line of the Luftwaffe, to the British army base at Aldershot, through the plains and mountains of Italy to the rolling farmlands of Ontario, Canada, the three Canadians novels – The Chalky Sea, The Alien Corn and The Frozen River - and their characters will grip you and keep you turning the pages all night.
    Show book
  • Double Homicide - Two Tales of True Crime - cover

    Double Homicide - Two Tales of...

    John Coston

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Two riveting true crime sagas—of a mother who murdered her two sons, and a sex-crazed serial killer who terrorized Montana—together in one volume.   In this terrifying collection, veteran reporter and former Wall Street Journal editor John Coston recounts the disturbing crimes of Ellen Boehm and Wayne Nance, two seemingly ordinary citizens who killed for the most twisted and selfish reasons.  Sleep, My Child, Forever: Single mom Ellen Boehm appeared to be a devoted mother. But in reality, she was unequipped for motherhood, financially strapped, and desperate. Within a year of each other, her sons, ages two and four, died mysteriously, and Boehm’s eight-year-old daughter suffered a near-fatal accident when a hair dryer fell into the girl’s bath. Det. Sgt. Joseph Burgoon of St. Louis Homicide soon unraveled a labyrinth of deception, greed, and obsession that revealed a cold-blooded killer whose get-rich-quick scheme came at the cost of her children’s lives.  To Kill and Kill Again: To neighbors, Wayne Nance appeared to be an affable, considerate, and trustworthy guy. No one knew that he was the “Missoula Mauler,” a psychopath responsible for a series of sadistic sex slayings that rocked the idyllic town between 1974 and 1986. His victims included a preacher’s wife, a teenage runaway, and a female acquaintance. Then, one September night, Nance pushed his luck, preying on a couple that lived to tell the tale.
    Show book
  • From Normandy to Auschwitz - cover

    From Normandy to Auschwitz

    Paul le Goupil

    • 2
    • 3
    • 0
    The odds on Paul le Goupil living to see the end of the Second World War let alone the 21st Century were negligible in 1944. Yet he did.As his extraordinary memoir describes, as a young man he found himself caught up in the maelstrom of the Second World War, active resistance to, and defiance of, the German occupation came naturally to Paul but led to his capture, beating and interrogation by the Gestapo and solitary incarceration in first French prisons. Worse still was to come and after an appalling journey and various labor camps he ended up in Auschwitz and Buchenwald. He experienced starvation, slave labor, unbelievable hardship—death for many was a relief.Paul survived but his suffering was not over as he and others had to endure a nightmare march before being liberated by the advancing Russians. All this and far more make this memoir an unforgettable, moving and inspiring account.
    Show book
  • Fatal Charm - The Shocking True Story of Serial Wife Killer Randy Roth - cover

    Fatal Charm - The Shocking True...

    Carlton Smith

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    From the bestselling author of The Search for the Green River Killer: A chilling true account of the dream husband who was every woman’s nightmare. Randy Roth was handsome, hardworking, kind, and in top physical shape. But for all his charm and good looks, he was seemingly cursed with the ladies. His first marriage ended in divorce before the couple’s fifth anniversary; his second wife plunged to her death during a hike; and his third wife left him after less than five months.   But when Roth’s fourth wife, Cynthia, drowned in an apparent speedboating accident in Washington State’s Lake Sammamish just weeks after their first anniversary, a pattern of suspicious behavior finally caught up to him. As Roth set about collecting on a hefty insurance payout, the authorities were on to his game.   Roth had been careful—and so close to getting away with it. But, as chronicled by Seattle Times reporter and Pulitzer Prize finalist Carlton Smith, his lies were about to come crashing down around him.  
    Show book
  • Six by Ten - Stories from Solitary - cover

    Six by Ten - Stories from Solitary

    Mateo Hoke, Taylor Pendergrass

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The growing movement against mass incarceration and harsh sentencing that began with books like The New Jim Crow, gets a human face as the stories of those impacted by the inhumanity of solitary confinement speak out. 
    The New Jim Crow has sold over a million copies and continues to be a focal point in the conversation about mass incarceration, including a new battle over whether or not prisoners can buy and read books like this one. 
    Ava DuVerney's electric documentry, 13, about the inequality of the prison industrial complex, was both critically acclaimed and widely viewed online. 
    The case of Kalif Browder, a juvenile who was locked in solitary for three years and later committed suicide after being released, has been widely discussed and featured in major news outlets. His story shined a light on the harsh reality of solitary, in particular for youth prisoners. 
    This book uses the power of oral history to weave together a stark portrait of what it is like in America’s most hostile prison environment: a six by ten cell in solitary.
    Show book
  • Kafka - The Early Years - cover

    Kafka - The Early Years

    Reiner Stach

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    How did Kafka become Kafka? This eagerly anticipated third and final volume of Reiner Stach's definitive biography of the writer answers that question with more facts and insight than ever before, describing the complex personal, political, and cultural circumstances that shaped the young Franz Kafka (1883–1924). It tells the story of the years from his birth in Prague to the beginning of his professional and literary career in 1910, taking the reader up to just before the breakthrough that resulted in his first masterpieces, including "The Metamorphosis." Brimming with vivid and often startling details, Stach’s narrative invites readers deep inside this neglected period of Kafka’s life. The book’s richly atmospheric portrait of his German Jewish merchant family and his education, psychological development, and sexual maturation draws on numerous sources, some still unpublished, including family letters, schoolmates’ memoirs, and early diaries of his close friend Max Brod. 
    The biography also provides a colorful panorama of Kafka’s wider world, especially the convoluted politics and culture of Prague. Before World War I, Kafka lived in a society at the threshold of modernity but torn by conflict, and Stach provides poignant details of how the adolescent Kafka witnessed violent outbreaks of anti-Semitism and nationalism. The reader also learns how he developed a passionate interest in new technologies, particularly movies and airplanes, and why another interest—his predilection for the back-to-nature movement—stemmed from his “nervous” surroundings rather than personal eccentricity. 
    The crowning volume to a masterly biography, this is an unmatched account of how a boy who grew up in an old Central European monarchy became a writer who helped create modern literature.
    Show book