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Dracusa - Tập 1: Ông Khách Kì Lạ - cover

Dracusa - Tập 1: Ông Khách Kì Lạ

Tác Giả: Eric Sanvoisin Và Martin Matje, Người Dịch: Ngô Diệu Châu, nxb Thời Đại

Publisher: Tác Giả: Eric Sanvoisin Và Martin Matje

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Summary

Những cuốn sách xếp hàng ngay ngắn trên giá đang gọi tôi. " Lại đây, lại đây! Mở Chúng tớ ra đi!" Lần đầu tiên một cuốn sách làm tôi thấy hứng khởi. Chà, ngon mê ly... Ngụm đầu tiên làm tôi vô cùng khoan khoái. Thật kì lạ, tôi đang cắn vào những câu chữ và nhai rau ráu những đoạn văn. Những cuốn sách xinh xắn thơm lựng , ngon tuyệt! Nhưng điều đáng ngạc nhiên hơn cả là những từ ngữ khác nhau hay câu chữ khác nhau mang lại cho tôi những hương vị khác nhau, chúng lan tỏa khắp lưỡi và vòm miệng tôi. Không phải tôi đang uống mực mà đang trải nghiệm những cuộc phiêu lưu thực thụ. Không phải tôi đang đọc những gì sảy ra, mà tôi đang sống..." Odilon, con trai của một người bán sách vốn rất ghét đọc sách. Nhưng rồi một ngày nọ, một ông khách kì lạ- con ma cà rồng dị ứng với máu đã chuyển sang hút mực tên là Dracusa xuất hiện. Cuộc gặp gỡ định mệnh với Dracusa đã biến Odilon thành một cậu bé hút mực say sách như điếu đổ...

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