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The Confidential Clerk - cover

The Confidential Clerk

T. S. Eliot

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

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Summary

A comedy of mistaken identities erupts in the household of a wealthy London entrepreneur in this play by the Nobel Prize–winning author. 
 
A motley play of family mysteries, The Confidential Clerk follows Sir Claude and Lady Elizabeth as they reconnect with their long-lost illegitimate children—even though they aren’t quite certain whose child is whose. “Extraordinarily good fun,” this is one of Eliot’s greatest comedies, full of wit, crisp dialogue, and parental hijinks laced with some of Eliot’s finest poetry and existential reveries (The Atlantic). 
 
Praise for The Confidential Clerk 
 
“The dialogue . . . has a precision and a lightly felt rhythm unmatched in the writing of any contemporary dramatist.” —Times Literary Supplement (UK) 
 
“A triumph of dramatic skill: the handling of the two levels of the play is masterly and Eliot’s verse registers its greatest achievement on the stage—passages of great lyrical beauty are incorporated into the dialogue.” —Spectator (UK)

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