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Inventions of the March Hare - Poems 1909–1917 - cover

Inventions of the March Hare - Poems 1909–1917

T. S. Eliot

Publisher: Mariner Books

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Summary

Discover another side of the Nobel Prize–winning modernist poet: “The imaginative dimensions of this [book] are altogether extraordinary” (The Boston Globe).   Hidden away for decades, this newly discovered trove of previously unpublished early works includes drafts of T .S. Eliot’s poems such as “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” and “Portrait of a Lady”—as well as ribald verse and other youthful curios that reveal a very different man from Eliot’s public persona.   Edited by Christopher Ricks, its publication was hailed by the New York Times Book Review as “perhaps the most significant event in Eliot scholarship in the past twenty-five years.”    

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