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Hair Breadth Escapes - Perilous incidents in the lives of sailors and travelers in Japan Cuba East Indies etc etc - cover

Hair Breadth Escapes - Perilous incidents in the lives of sailors and travelers in Japan Cuba East Indies etc etc

T. S. Arthur

Publisher: Good Press

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Summary

"Hair Breadth Escapes" by T. S. Arthur. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

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