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Jerusalem Gap - cover

Jerusalem Gap

T. R. Pearson

Publisher: Barking Mad Press

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Summary

Donald Atwell didn't want a dog.  He already had an ex-wife, a balky truck, and a cat that was part Persian and part Taliban.  But when a passing yokel tossed his puppy out on the side of the road, Donald didn't have much choice but to pick her up and take her in. Jerusalem Gap is the story of how, in saving a mutt, one prickly old cuss saved himself a little as well. 
T.R. Pearson enchants us with his unique voice and rich language.  He is my favorite writer 
--John Grisham 

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