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Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland - cover

Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland

Thomas Crofton Croker

Publisher: Good Press

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Summary

In 'Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland' by Thomas Crofton Croker, the reader is transported into the world of Irish folklore through a collection of enchanting tales about fairies, ghosts, and other supernatural beings. Written in a captivating and descriptive style, the book provides a unique insight into the rich literary tradition of Ireland, showcasing the beliefs and customs of the people. Croker's attention to detail and his ability to evoke a sense of wonder make this book a must-read for anyone interested in the magical realm of Irish mythology. Thomas Crofton Croker, a respected folklorist and antiquarian, drew inspiration from his Irish heritage and the oral traditions passed down through generations. His dedication to preserving these stories led him to compile this comprehensive collection, shedding light on the cultural significance of these legends. I highly recommend 'Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland' to readers who enjoy delving into the mystical world of folklore and exploring the traditions of Ireland. Croker's masterful storytelling and deep appreciation for Irish culture make this book a fascinating and informative read for anyone interested in the supernatural.
Available since: 11/22/2019.
Print length: 941 pages.

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