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The Cursed Scarab - cover

The Cursed Scarab

Suzanne Weyn

Publisher: Scholastic Inc.

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Summary

An Egyptian artifact from the Haunted Museum sends a young girl on a wild adventure in this spooky tale by the author of The Pearl Earring. 
 
Don’t touch anything in The Haunted Museum! 
 
Taylor has always felt a little like she belonged in ancient Egypt more than she does in the modern day. But when she helps stop a robbery at a branch of The Haunted Museum, the scarab she picks up doesn’t seem to want to let her go. Mysterious people follow her from the United States all the way to Egypt. Scarabs appear from nowhere. Her dreams (or are they visions?) take her far into the past and show her secrets that have long been buried in desert sands. None of it makes sense, and no one seems to believe that anything out of the ordinary is happening. 
 
If Taylor can’t untangle the present from the past and break the ancient curse she’d unleashed, she knows that she might be entombed in Egypt forever! 
 
Praise for The Titanic Locket 
 
“Hair-raising. . . . Weyn keeps unexpected chills coming. . . . A quick, jittery read.” —Publishers Weekly 
 
“Weyn ratchets up the eeriness . . . and quickly builds to a stormy climax.” —Kirkus Reviews
Available since: 04/28/2015.
Print length: 213 pages.

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