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Home to Woefield - A Novel - cover

Home to Woefield - A Novel

Susan Juby

Publisher: HarperCollins e-books

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Summary

“I laughed out loud more times reading this book than any book I’ve read in years….I never wanted to leave Woefield, and you won’t, either.”—Meg Cabot, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Princess Diaries and InsatiableSusan Juby, already a reader-favorite YA author, makes her triumphant first foray into adult contemporary fiction with Home to Woefield, a hilarious, wildly original, and wonderfully insightful tale of no-so-ordinary life down on the farm. Told in four delightfully distinct narrative voices—a crusty 70-something farmer, a hair band-loving teen, a precocious 11-year old, and an earnest New Yorker in her 20s—Home to Woefield will enchant readers of all ages, as its motley cast struggles to avoid foreclosure with outlandish schemes and prize-winning chickens.
Available since: 03/08/2011.
Print length: 323 pages.

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