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Dorchester History Tour - cover

Dorchester History Tour

Steve Wallis

Publisher: Amberley Publishing

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Summary

Dorchester History Tour is a unique insight into the illustrious history of this famous Dorset town. This is an exciting guided walk around the town, its well-known streets and historic sites, and explains what they meant to local people throughout its eventful history. Readers are invited to take a tour and watch the changing face of Dorchester as Steve Wallis guides us through the local streets.

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