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America's Secret Aristocracy - cover

America's Secret Aristocracy

Stephen Birmingham

Publisher: Open Road Distribution

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Summary

America’s Secret Aristocracy is a report from inside the shush-shush inner circle of America’s upper crust. Full of eccentric family members and well-sourced gossip, bestselling writer Stephen Birmingham spins an entertaining social history.  

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