Reading without limits, the perfect plan for #stayhome
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
My Morningless Mornings - cover

My Morningless Mornings

Stefany Anne Golberg

Publisher: The Unnamed Press

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

"Hypnotically written and impressively weird, My Morningless Mornings is an intense and harrowing meditation on Stefany Anne Golberg's youthful insomnia. More than that, though, it's a moving mini-portrait of the bond between a father and his daughter. I really loved this book."— Tom Bissell 

Have you had a reason to avoid the morning? To wish you didn’t have to wake up and face your life? For Stefany Anne Golberg, the morning itself became a possibility she could no longer tolerate, and at age fourteen she erased it all together.

In a ranch house in a Vegas suburb, Golberg’s peculiar brand of insomnia lives alongside an ailing father, a professor on permanent leave from the local university. Her mother has moved out, her older brother has gone to college, and she is alone with the night, resisting the fundamental unit by which we measure our lives: the next day itself. 

Startling, poignant, and harrowing, Golberg’s voice is informed by an eclectic range of interests, from Bruegel to Jung, Loren Eiseley to Marina Tsvetaeva.  Equal parts coming-of-age memoir, art history, and philosophical inquiry, My Morningless Mornings is a young person’s reckoning with consciousness.

Other books that might interest you

  • Of Freedom and God - cover

    Of Freedom and God

    Marjan Rožanc

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Of Freedom and God, Jeremi Slak and Jason Blake’s translation of essays by Marjan Rožanc, contains a selection of essays from the 1995 collection »O svobodi in bogu" (Of Freedom and God) that Andrej Inkret put together and edited. Left out of the English translation are primarily those essays that are very local in nature; the red thread of the essays included in the English translation show a “European dimension” and an openness to the broader spiritual and literary space which at the same time is always realized in the most intimate and narrow of surroundings. As Andrej Inkret writes in his afterword to the collection: “from the very first texts, [Rožanc’s essays] are based on questioning any apodictic, purely rationalistic answers. Moreover, Rožanc’s essays are even derived from the thought that new-age man, with his unique, inimitable personal individuality as well as his socio-political being, is placed into an open, free, uncertain world in which there are no longer, and no longer can be, any more a priori, self-understood and unambiguous 'transcendent’ values that might, from the outset, afford man a firm point of reference, thought or, for example, a home.”
    Show book
  • The Paris Diary & The New York Diary - 1951–1961 - cover

    The Paris Diary & The New York...

    Ned Rorem

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    In the earliest published diaries of Ned Rorem, the acclaimed American composer recalls a bygone era and its luminaries, celebrates the creative process, and examines the gay culture of Europe and the US during the 1950sOne of America’s most significant contemporary composers, Ned Rorem is also widely acclaimed as a diarist of unique insight and refreshing candor. Together, his Paris Diary, first published in 1966, and The New York Diary,which followed a year later, paint a colorful landscape of Rorem’s world and its famous inhabitants, as well as a fascinating self-portrait of a footloose young artist unabashedly drinking deeply of life. In this amalgam of forthright personal reflections and cogent social commentary, unprecedented for its time, Rorem’s anecdotal recollections of the decade from 1951 to 1961 represent Gay Liberation in its infancy as the author freely expresses his open sexuality not as a revelation but as a simple fact of life. At once blisteringly honest and exquisitely entertaining, Rorem’s diaries expound brilliantly on the creative process, following their peripatetic author from Paris to Morocco to Italy and back home to America as he crosses paths with Picasso, Cocteau, Gide, Boulez, and other luminaries of the era.  With consummate skill and unexpurgated insight, a younger, wilder Rorem reflects on a bygone time and culture and, in doing so, holds a revealing mirror to himself. 
    Show book
  • Searching for Family and Traditions at the French Table Book One (Champagne Alsace Lorraine and Paris regions) - cover

    Searching for Family and...

    Carole Bumpus

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Part culinary memoir and part travelogue, Carole Bumpus gathered this compilation of intimate interviews, conversations, stories, and traditional family recipes (cuisine pauvre) in the kitchens of French families as she traveled throughout the countryside. Travel with her through Champagne caves/wineries and historic cathedrals, local farmers’ markets, ancient potters’ guilds, and restaurant kitchens with wood-fire ovens. Learn how to make homemade Spinach-stuffed Tortellini with Bolognaise Sauce from the Champagne region, Crêpes and Watercress-stuffed Ravioli from the Lorraine, and Baekeofe and Kugelhopf from the Alsace. “Go blind” from the family stock of Eau de Vie liqueur and be treated to tales of foraging for snails for the infamous and now extinct Escargots Festival. And, on a somber note, listen to accounts of families forced from their communities during the German occupation of WWII in the Alsace and Lorraine, only to continue to struggle for survival after finally making their way home.
    
    
    
    This book is a compilation of stories about making ends meet; about people being grateful for all they had, even when they had almost nothing; about the sharing of family jokes and laughter; and about family trials and triumphs. This book is about people savoring the life they have been given.
    Show book
  • Revolution's End - The Patty Hearst Kidnapping Mind Control and the Secret History of Donald DeFreeze and the SLA - cover

    Revolution's End - The Patty...

    Brad Schreiber

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    “A stunning and chilling expose of . . . the rise of the Symbionese Liberation Army and the kidnapping of bad-girl heiress Patty Hearst” (David Talbot, founder of Salon).  Revolution’s End fully explains the most famous kidnapping in US history, detailing Patty Hearst’s relationship with Donald DeFreeze, known as Cinque, head of the Symbionese Liberation Army. Not only did the heiress have a sexual relationship with DeFreeze while he was imprisoned; she didn’t know he was an informant and a victim of prison behavior modification.   Neither Hearst nor the white radicals who followed DeFreeze realized that he was molded by a CIA officer and allowed to escape. His secret mission was to infiltrate and discredit Bay Area anti-war radicals and the Black Panther Party, the nexus of seventies activism. When that failed, DeFreeze was alienated from his controllers and decided to become a revolutionary, since his life was in jeopardy. The kidnapping of Hearst sparked one of the largest shootouts in U.S. history—which killed six members of the SLA in South Central Los Angeles—and ended when the LAPD set fire to the house and incinerated those six radicals on live television, nationwide, as a warning to American leftists.   “A gripping read—a persuasive, well-researched and detailed interpretation of what is known about the SLA kidnapping of Patty Hearst.” —Peter Dale Scott, author of The American Deep State   “This book careens to its bloody ending with all of the inevitability of a train wreck. Schreiber . . . ignites the past in chilling detail and at the same time shines an uncanny and unsettling light on who we are today.” —T. Jefferson Parker, New York Times–bestselling author
    Show book
  • The Best Girl - cover

    The Best Girl

    Joan Hicks Boone

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Joan’s neighborhood is filled with kids of all ages, but even her closest friends don’t know how violent Joan’s dad is, or how difficult it is for her to navigate the troubled waters of her home life. Joan becomes adept at reading her dad’s mood, and trying to prevent him from inflicting harm upon her mom. But, time and again, her dad succeeds in his mission. As the violence escalates, Joan is plagued with the constant fear that her mother may die. Repeatedly she asks the same questions: why is her dad so violent and why can’t he be stopped? Throughout the course of her childhood, several heroes enter Joan’s life. Readers will cheer for each as they offer Joan gifts of validation, acceptance and hope.  
    Joan’s exceptional yet frank storytelling brings the reader directly into her home, providing unembellished awareness of the multiple issues that encompass domestic violence. The Best Girl is a story of resilience and survival and, as the book concludes, readers are left with feelings of possibility and hope: it appears that sixteen-year old Joan is going to make it.
    Show book
  • The Attica Turkey Shoot - Carnage Cover-Up and the Pursuit of Justice - cover

    The Attica Turkey Shoot -...

    Malcolm Bell

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    “Malcolm Bell’s powerful story of the Attica prison uprising . . . has the ring of truth” (Studs Terkel, Pulitzer Prize–winning author and historian).  The Attica Turkey Shoot tells a story that New York State did not want you to know. In 1971, following a prison riot at the Attica Correctional Facility, state police and prison guards slaughtered thirty-nine hostages and inmates, and tortured more than one thousand men after they had surrendered. State officials pretended they could not successfully prosecute the law officers who perpetrated this carnage, and then those same officials scurried for shelter when a prosecutor named Malcolm Bell exposed the cover-up.   Bell traveled a rocky road to a justice of sorts as he sought to prosecute without fear or favor—in spite of the deck officials had stacked to keep police from facing the same justice that had filled the Attica prison in the first place. His insider’s account illuminates the all-too-common contrast between the justice of the privileged and the justice of the rest.   Also included in this book is evidence from recently uncovered tapes that Gov. Nelson Rockefeller knew his order for troopers to attack could cost the lives of hundreds of inmates and all of those hostages. The Attica Turkey Shoot highlights the hypocrisy of a criminal justice system that decides who goes to prison and who enjoys impunity in a nation where no one is said to be above the law.  
    Show book