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Paul Verlaine - cover

Paul Verlaine

Stefan Zweig

Translator Otto Frederick Theis

Publisher: Readme, LLC

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Summary

"No poet of recent years has possessed this need of expressing his life to others, more imperatively, pitifully, or tragically than Paul Verlaine, because no other poet was so weak to the press of destiny."From prominent writer Stefan Zweig comes the biography of one of the greatest representatives of the fin de siècle in international and French poetry â?? Paul Verlaine.

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