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Men Lie Cameras Don't - A Sexy Exhibitionist Group FFM Bi Short Story from Steam Books - cover

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Men Lie Cameras Don't - A Sexy Exhibitionist Group FFM Bi Short Story from Steam Books

Steam Books, Dana Burns

Publisher: Steam Books

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Summary

Samantha is going to show her cyber-boyfriend, Michael, the performance  of a lifetime on webcam. She has quite the surprise for him… and he has  quite the surprise for her. In fact, this will be a night full of  surprises for all parties involved.  WARNING: This 9,604-word short story is a steamy read that features  explicit scenes including exhibitionism, web cameras, oral sex, group  sex, and may be too much for some readers to handle!  BONUS! This ebook contains a preview of the hot story "Party Hearty" by Logan Woods. 

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