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Hartlepool The Postcard Collection - cover

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Hartlepool The Postcard Collection

Stan Laundon|Paul Chrystal

Publisher: Amberley Publishing

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Summary

Hartlepool's history is steeped shipbuilding, steel-making and fishing the sea; West Hartlepool and 'old' Hartlepool are the two towns which grew up to foster these industries in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This fascinating book describes and depicts the intriguing story of the two towns and the people who worked the fish quays, shipyards and steel mills, or supported and serviced the workforces in their shops, factories, schools and pubs. If you want a nostalgic and illuminating pictorial history of West Hartlepool and Hartlepool, Seaton, Blackhall and Crimdon, then this does it all for you over ninety-six pages and 200 pictures.

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