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Elektra - A New Translation - cover

Elektra - A New Translation

Sophocles

Publisher: Harper Perennial

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Summary

Among the most celebrated plays of ancient Athens, Elektra is one of seven surviving dramas by the great Greek playwright, Sophocles, now available from Harper Perennial in a vivid and dynamic new translation by award-winning poet Robert Bagg. Elektra masterfully explores the consequences of revenge—both for those who bear the brunt of violence and for those who become obsessed by hatred under its influence—as it focuses on the cycle of bloodshed that consumes a royal family. This is Sophocles, vibrant and alive, for a new generation.

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