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Moving Up The Ladder: Development Challenges For Low And Middle-income Asia - Development Challenges for Low and Middle-Income Asia - cover

Moving Up The Ladder: Development Challenges For Low And Middle-income Asia - Development Challenges for Low and Middle-Income Asia

Shigeyuki Hamori, Takuji Kinkyo, Shigesaburo Kabe, Ryuichi Ushiyama

Publisher: WSPC

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Summary

Besides export expansion, a growing middle class in Asia has contributed to the area's economic expansion, providing Asian countries with a window of opportunity to leap from low/middle income levels to high income levels. It may sound easy for these countries to run up the ladder of economic growth, but the potential risks of quickly shifting from low/middle to high income levels are often overlooked. Careful studies in history reveal that the experience of moving up the ladder of economic growth has varied among countries.This book explores (1) the current state of Asian economies and 2) the conditions or policy counter-measures that lead to higher income levels under changing external circumstances. This is illustrated through case studies on five Asian economies, with emphasis on their structural problems. It also aims to paint a comprehensive picture of necessary policies, which will encourage Asian countries to move up the ladder of growth.

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