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Tug of War - The Battle for Italy 1943–1945 - cover

Tug of War - The Battle for Italy 1943–1945

Shelford Bidwell, Dominick Graham

Publisher: Pen & Sword Military Classics

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Summary

When the Allies invaded mainland Italy in 1943 they intended only a clearing-up operation to knock Italy out of the war, but Hitler ordered the German armies to defend every foot of the country. The 'Tug of War' was the mysterious force which caused a war to race out of control, and attract vast numbers of men, tanks, guns and aircraft. The book analyses the main battles of Salerno, Cassino, Anzio and the march on Rome.
Available since: 05/30/2004.
Print length: 452 pages.

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