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The Baghdad Clock - cover

The Baghdad Clock

Shahad Al Rawi

Translator Luke Leafgren

Publisher: Oneworld Publications

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Summary

SHORTLISTED FOR THE INTERNATIONAL PRIZE FOR ARABIC FICTION 2018
 
A HEART-RENDING TALE OF TWO GIRLS GROWING UP IN WAR-TORN BAGHDAD
 
Baghdad, 1991. The Gulf War is raging. Two girls, hiding in an air raid shelter, tell stories to keep the fear and the darkness at bay, and a deep friendship is born. But as the bombs continue to fall and friends begin to flee the country, the girls must face the fact that their lives will never be the same again.
 
This poignant debut novel reveals just what it's like to grow up in a city that is slowly disappearing in front of your eyes, and how in the toughest times, children can build up the greatest resilience.

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