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MillenniALL - How to claim your future in the Age of the Millennial - cover

MillenniALL - How to claim your future in the Age of the Millennial

Sean Purcell

Publisher: Panoma Press

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Summary

Is it time to take the millennial generation more seriously?
 
Fed up with listening to the same lazy stereotypes thrown around about this generation, Sean Purcell sets out the challenges and opportunities facing millennials, and explains why we are entering The Age of the Millennial.
 
The millennial generation is rapidly becoming the largest and most influential globally, whether it is in politics, economics, business, or civic society. This requires everyone to begin to explore what it means to be a millennial today. This book looks at politics, economics, business, housing, employment, and relationships all from the perspective of a millennial.
 
Sean is passionate that your skills, qualities and attributes are exactly what the world needs right now. The book inspires and motivates, as well as encouraging all millennials to proudly identify with the term.

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