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15-Minute Dictation - More Books Less Frustration - cover

15-Minute Dictation - More Books Less Frustration

Sean M. Platt, Neeve Silver

Publisher: Sterling & Stone

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Summary

End the frustration and learn dictation in just 15 minutes a day.
 
Sean Platt spent over a decade trying to learn dictation, without success. He ended up frustrated and giving up after every attempt. After a sudden insight one day he made a few tweaks to his approach to dictation and has used dictation every day since.
 
In 15-Minute Dictation Platt and Silver show you how to adjust your approach to dictation to leave behind frustrating starts and stops and finally be able to produce more books in less time. 
 
You will discover:
 
-Why authors struggle with dictation, and how to break the cycle of starts and stops.
 
-The surprising hidden benefits you get when you learn dictation (it’s not just about going faster).
 
-How to rewire your brain to access your storytelling skills via dictation.
 
-Why your stories get more creative when you dictate (and why most authors fear the opposite).
 
-The “15-minute method” to get over the initial struggle and add dictation as a tool in your author toolbox.
 
-Suggested tools to make dictation work for you.
 
-Fun and practical exercises to help you get dictating today!
 
This fun, practical and short read will help you ditch the fears that have held you back, the frustrations that keep you in the stop/start cycle, and finally help you dictate. You can produce more books, with less frustration… in just 15 minutes a day.

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