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Indigenous Rights - Changes and Challenges in the 21st Century - cover

Indigenous Rights - Changes and Challenges in the 21st Century

Sarah Sargent

Publisher: University of Buckingham Press

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Summary

Over 25 years in the making, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is described by the UN as setting "an important standard for the treatment of indigenous peoples that will undoubtedly be a significant tool towards eliminating human rights violations against the planet's 370 million indigenous people and assisting them in combating discrimination and marginalisation."
Available since: 12/08/2016.

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