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Everyone In LA Is an REDACTED - Book One - cover

Everyone In LA Is an REDACTED - Book One

Sarah Fuller, Sarah Noffke, Michael Anderle

Publisher: LMBPN Publishing

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Summary

LA is a beast. A city that swallows most with its glamour and glitz.
 
Not Sarah Fuller though.
 
Stubborn and relentless, Sarah refuses to be changed by her surroundings. Often, she takes a cynical approach, judging the world around her, though never taking anything too seriously.
 
Thrown back into the dating arena in her late thirties, Sarah encounters brand new challenges.
 
Readers will laugh out loud at the adventures and mishaps this sassy protagonist gets herself into. She explores LA life, seeing it through her unique lens.
 
Hair extensions, goat yoga, socialites and all the strangeness that comes out of LA weave together in this crazy, episodic adventure.
 
Can you handle the absurdities? 
 
Fans of Chelsea Handler and Sex in the City will love Everyone in LA is an Asshole, a series that doesn’t hold back and says what we’re all secretly thinking.   

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