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Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose - Feared Even in Captivity - cover

Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose - Feared Even in Captivity

Santanu Banerjee

Publisher: Bloomsbury India

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Summary

The book tells the reader how after Second World War, Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose, the tallest Indian freedom fighter, slowly petered out in captivity in former Soviet Union, while Kremlin, taking full military advantage of Bose's presence in their land created fear in American and British political and military strategists and among the post-Independence Indian politicians. The research has also been an outcome of British and Indian Government documents and long interviews with senior Indian political leaders. The book is extremely sensitive as the stakeholders are not only big global powers, but the unresolved issue involves the Indian Government which puts a lid on the mystery by sticking to the fake air crash story in 1945 in Taiwan. It is bound to stir up a lot of heat with scholars – especially among, the British, Indian and American, besides exposing the role of the Russians, Indian Communists and the Nehru family that still heads the Congress now. 
 
What began as a journey into the unknown, has culminated into this book, an attempt which has taken 32 long years for the author.  The research also reveals Bose's socio-political ideology about which he spoke during his Tokyo University speech on the Indian Civilization and how India would have `socialism with a human face.' It also happens to be an issue so far neglected by scholars and historians.

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