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Swami Ramdev: Ek Yogi Ek Yodha - Swami Ramdev ki Pehli aur Ekmatra Jeevani - cover

Swami Ramdev: Ek Yogi Ek Yodha - Swami Ramdev ki Pehli aur Ekmatra Jeevani

Sandeep Deo

Publisher: Bloomsbury India

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Summary

Can you imagine a man on excursion with the mission to inspire .2 million people through the medium of yoga everyday? If Swami Ramdev's movement would have happened in any other part of the world then a lot of universities would have done Ph. D on it! I asked him that we understand that you get energy, health and exaltation from Yoga but please tell us from where do you find the strength to face so many torments from all over. 
Baba Ramdev went for a mission to promote health of all citizens so that poor people can keep optimum health through yoga and overcome diseases that cannot be cured even through expensive medicines. But while on this mission, he found out that the bigger problem lies within the country than globally with regards to health. Then he started to raise his voice. He is man of determination and once he takes aim, he does not give up until it is accomplished.

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