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The Way of All Flesh - cover

The Way of All Flesh

Samuel Merwin

Publisher: WSBLD

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Summary

A semi-autobiographical novel that attacks Victorian era hypocrisy as it traces four generations of the Pontifex family. Butler dared not publish it during his lifetime, but when it was published, it was accepted as part of the general revulsion against Victorianism.

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