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Furious Love - Elizabeth Taylor Richard Burton and the Marriage of the Century - cover

Furious Love - Elizabeth Taylor Richard Burton and the Marriage of the Century

Sam Kashner, Nancy Schoenberger

Publisher: HarperCollins e-books

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Summary

From veteran entertainment reporter Sam Kashner and biographer Nancy Schoenberger comes the definitive account of the greatest Hollywood love story ever told—the romance of Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. Kashner has interviewed Elizabeth Taylor numerous times and is the only journalist given access to her extensive collection of personal letters and journals, and he and Schoenberger have also interviewed the Burton family at length, including Burton’s actress daughter Kate. This is truly an authorized and singularly informed biography of these two larger-than-life stars, and of their glamorous, volatile, and audacious relationship.

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