Slay dragons. Discover the killer. Make Love. Read without limits. #WorldBookDay offer until April 28!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Milk and Honey - cover

Milk and Honey

Rupi Kaur

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

  • 15
  • 105
  • 0

Summary

The book is divided into four chapters, and each chapter serves a different purpose. Deals with a different pain. Heals a different heartache. Milk and Honey takes readers through a journey of the most bitter moments in life and finds sweetness in them because there is sweetness everywhere if you are just willing to look.

Other books that might interest you

  • Poetry Of American Patriotism - cover

    Poetry Of American Patriotism

    Ralph Waldo Emerson

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The United States of America: Land of the Brave, Home of the Free.  The United States was born by rebelling from the grasp of the British Empire, forging its own unique identity with a constitution based on equality for all.  Undoubtedly this was an ideal rather than a standard for all. However what has been taken up by all is a love of Country proudly held by all.  Many may disagree with the Government of the day but all support the idea of America.  Here its eminent wordsmiths craft their views and thoughts in beautiful poems that explain, deepen and bring forth that love of country expressed as Patriotism.
    Show book
  • First Person Sorrowful - cover

    First Person Sorrowful

    Ko Un

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Ko Un has long been a living legend in Korea, both as a poet and as a person. Allen Ginsberg once wrote, 'Ko Un is a magnificent poet, combination of Buddhist cognoscente, passionate political libertarian, and naturalist historian.' When a writer has published as much as Ko Un has in the course of more than fifty years of writing, it is hard to know where to begin, what to translate. For this collection, his translators have selected a hundred or so poems from the five collections published since the year 2002, collections acclaimed by Korean criti as bringing poetry to a new level of cosmic reference. Nothing shows more clearly his stature as a writer than the variety of themes and emotions found in his most recent work. Readers here have access for the first time to many of the poems Ko Un has produced in the 21st century, as he approaches his eightieth year, his energy and originality unabated. As Michael McLure wrote years ago: 'Ko Un's poetry has the old-fashionedness of a muddy rut on a country road after rain, and yet it is also as state-of-the-art as a DNA micro-chip.' That remains true today.
    Show book
  • Shards from the Polar Ice - Selected Poems - cover

    Shards from the Polar Ice -...

    Lydia Grigorieva

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    “It would be hard to imagine Russian poetry in the last half century without Lydia Grigorieva,” writes eminent Russian poet and critic Konstantin Kedrov. Grigorieva is a uniquely individual voice, bucking the trends of modernist poetry to create her own distinctive and beguiling body of poetry.
     
    Her work draws on her own remarkable life to create startlingly arresting images and metaphors, full of beauty and power, from her series that emerged from her Arctic childhood, to the troubles that beset Ukraine. Her range of influences is wide, and Beethoven, Freud, Sylvia Plath and Byron all appear in her poems as well as more familiar Russian images.
     
    At the heart of Grigorieva’s poetry is what she calls its ‘musicality’ – her firm belief in the power of rhyme and rhythm in creating a poetic experience. In this first major collection of her work in English, English poet John Farndon, working with Grigorieva and co-translator Olga Nakston, has recreated this musicality in English so that English readers might experience for the first time what makes her work so revered in her Russian homeland.
     
    Translated by John Farndon with Olga Nakston. Maxim Hodak - Максим Ходак (Publisher),
     
    Max Mendor - Макс Мендор (Director),
     
    Ksenia Papazova (Managing Editor).
    Show book
  • Empty Bottles Full of Stories - cover

    Empty Bottles Full of Stories

    Robert M. Drake, r.h. Sin

    • 2
    • 50
    • 1
    What are you hiding behind your smile? If those empty bottles that line the walls of your room could speak, what tales would they spill? So much of your truth is buried beneath the lies you tell yourself. There’s a need to scream to the moon; there’s this urge to go out into the darkness of the night to purge. There are so many stories living inside your soul, you just want the opportunity to tell them. And when you can’t find the will to express what lives within your heart, these words will give you peace. These words will set you free.
    Show book
  • Born to Love Cursed to Feel - cover

    Born to Love Cursed to Feel

    Samantha King Holmes

    • 13
    • 218
    • 1
    Born to Love, Cursed to Feel is about love—the good, the bad, and the confusing. It touches on morals and how when emotions are involved it’s not as black and white. The poetry is frequently written in a narrative manner that evocatively pulls you in and makes you feel. This book is about falling in love, bad decisions, and ultimately growth. The essence of it all is to show that no matter how far one falls all the mistakes don’t have to be what defines them.
    Show book
  • Dream Work - cover

    Dream Work

    Mary Oliver

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Dream Work, a collection of forty-five poems, follows both chrono­logically and logically Mary Oliver's American Primitive, which won her the Pulitzer Prize for the finest book of poetry published in 1983 by an American poet.  The depth and diversity of perceptual awareness—so steadfast and radiant in American Primitive—continue in DreamWork. She has turned her attention in these poems to the solitary and difficult labors of the spirit—to accepting the truth about one's personal world, and to valuing the triumphs while transcending the fail­ures of human relationships.  Whether by way of inheritance—as in her poem about the Holocaust—or through a painful glimpse into the present—as in Acid, a poem about an injured boy begging in the streets of Indonesia—the events and tendencies of history take on a new importance here.  More deeply than in her previous volumes, the sensibility behind these poems has merged with the world. Mary Oliver's willingness to be joyful continues, deepened by self-awareness, by experience, and by choice.
    Show book