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Milk and Honey - cover

Milk and Honey

Rupi Kaur

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

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Summary

The book is divided into four chapters, and each chapter serves a different purpose. Deals with a different pain. Heals a different heartache. Milk and Honey takes readers through a journey of the most bitter moments in life and finds sweetness in them because there is sweetness everywhere if you are just willing to look.

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