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The Horse That Wouldn't Trot - cover

The Horse That Wouldn't Trot

Rose Miller

Publisher: Rose Miller Books and More

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Summary

Follow Rose Miller's life as she becomes a nationally known Tennessee Walking Horse owner, amateur exhibitor, breeder and judge of pleasure horses. Learn as she does, about the horrible act of "soring" the front feet of show horses to make them step high, and how to compete against it when you do not ever do it. Meet several stallions including Supreme Xanadu, a Nationa  Supreme Versatility Champion who garnered points in "over fences" when few walking horses attempted to jump. He had to compete in open shows against "real jumpers," but eventually got enough points to get the award. Rose's first stallion, Delight's Headman, was terror to breed, indeed might just have serviced the tractor if it were in his mating spot! The last stallion, and the love of Rose's heart,  was Praise Hallelujah who competed in tough pleasure classes against sored horses. With the help of renouned dressage instructor, Charles Sherman, Hallelujah and Rose competed at the highest show level and many times brought home the blues. And how in heck do you teach a horse to breed a large black barrel to collect semen? Well, many apples were involved! Read the history of the Tennessee Walking Horse, how soring began and why.  Mares with their own opinion of life in general and becoming mothers in particular will have you laughing and crying. Because of a frustrating horse issue, the author is introduced to animal communication. What she learns is mind-opening to say the least. Rose's honest and straightforward approach to sharing her compelling journey to become a true horsewoman is endearing and humbling. The detail and humor in which she shares her memories is fascinating "The Horse That Wouldn't Trot" is suitable for readers of all ages and has a timeless story to share.

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