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Unlimited Overs - A Season of Midlife Cricket - cover

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Unlimited Overs - A Season of Midlife Cricket

Roger Morgan-Grenville

Publisher: Quiller

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Summary

As Roger Morgan-Grenville prepares for a new season with the White Hunter Cricket Club, he is starting to feel his age, so he embarks on a secret plan of coaching, yoga and psychology to improve his game. Will he emerge as a sporting demi-god, or will his team-mates even notice the difference? 
This is the humorous and heartwarming story of that cricket season, as the White Hunters go from disaster to triumph. It is a tale of competitiveness, suspense, excellence, hospitality and incompetence, such as the missing fielder found asleep in the woods and the two opening bowlers whose MG Roadster breaks down on the way to the game. 
From the Castle Ground at Arundel to a field next to a nudist camp in France, players such as the Tree Hugger, the Gun Runner, and their wicket-keeper, the Human Sieve, share the dream that this might be their day. Above all, it is the uplifting story of friendship among a team of not-very-good players who find enough moments of near brilliance to remind them why they love the game of cricket. 
'Ever self-deprecating, R M-G has nailed his whimsical colours to the mast with his latest volume on the trials of the legendary White Hunters CC. His turn of phrase is without parallel. Who else would or could come up with the line, "Clinging on to my innings like a sloth to the underside of a Cecopria tree”?' - David Gower, legendary former England cricket captain

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