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The Beckoning Tide: Holidays in Mayaro - A Memoir - cover

The Beckoning Tide: Holidays in Mayaro - A Memoir

Robin Mohamid

Publisher: Robin Mohamid

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Summary

The East Coast of Trinidad. The seaside village of Plaisance, Mayaro. Pulling seine, catching crabs, playing cricket and football on the sand, walks along the beach, looking at the sunrise, swimming whenever you wanted, the sun shining, the surf rolling... 
When Robin's mother passed away he was overcome with nostalgia for his childhood in Trinidad. The memories that came flooding back to him of holidays spent at Mayaro Beach with his family were instrumental in helping him recover from the devastating loss. Recollections of a deliriously happy youth were the healing balm he needed personally, and a legacy he wanted to pass along to his own children. 
Through the eyes of ten-year-old Robin, The Beckoning Tide shares the joy of those days and weeks spent at the beach, and his carefree coming of age. Through those childhood recollections and reflections, Robin is able to deal with the changes in his life as an adult, and to cherish the profound sense of belonging that only the blessings of close family can bring. 
This book reminds us all that, even for those lucky enough to have spent summers at the family cottage or to have lived in an exotic piece of paradise, the most special place to be is with the people you love and the biggest treasure is the bond of family.

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