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Mr Capone - cover

Mr Capone

Robert Schoenberg

Publisher: HarperCollins e-books

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Summary

    All I ever did was to sell beer and whiskey to our best people. All I ever did was to supply a demand that was pretty popular. 
    Why, the very guys that make my trade good are the ones that yell the loudest about me. Some of the leading judges use the stuff. 
    When I sell liquor, it's called bootlegging. When my patrons serve it on silver trays on Lake Shore Drive, it's called hospitality. 
-- Al Capone

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