Do you dare to read without limits?
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
The Mueller Report: The Full Report on Donald Trump Collusion and Russian Interference in the Presidential Election - cover

The Mueller Report: The Full Report on Donald Trump Collusion and Russian Interference in the Presidential Election

Robert S. Mueller

Publisher: NTMC

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

In the future, The Mueller Report may be judged as the most important document of our time. And no matter where you reside on the American political spectrum, you will probably agree that it will have far-reaching implications for the balance of power among the three coequal branches of government that create, administer, and apply the laws of our republic. With forewords by Lt. Col. Allen B. West (Ret.), and the Hon. Dan Boren, both former congressmen who served on opposite sides of the aisle while Robert Mueller served as director of the FBI, they hold insight into the leadership of the organization created expressly to investigate the questions answered by this report.

Other books that might interest you

  • Unfinished Murder - The Pursuit of a Serial Rapist - cover

    Unfinished Murder - The Pursuit...

    James Neff

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    Edgar Award Finalist: The hunt for Ronnie Shelton, Cleveland’s West Side Rapist, and the victims who united for justice—“Groundbreaking” (Ann Rule).   From 1983 to 1988, serial rapist Ronnie Shelton preyed on the women of Cleveland. Dubbed the West Side Rapist, twenty-seven-year-old Shelton would spy on his victims, stalk them, and brutally assault them in their homes. Arrested at least fifteen times for other crimes, Shelton slipped through the cracks of an overburdened police department so often it seemed he would never be caught.   Based on more than 150 interviews with the survivors, the police, psychiatrists, and Shelton himself, this “groundbreaking study of the infinite perils of serial rape” is the extensively researched story of Shelton’s crimes and the five-year pursuit that ended in his capture (Ann Rule). Investigative journalist James Neff also documents the long-term devastation caused by rape and celebrates the courage of the women who helped to put a sexual predator behind bars. It resulted in a sentence of 3,195 years—the longest in Ohio state history.   A finalist for the Edgar Award, Unfinished Murder is “not only a riveting nonfiction thriller but an important account about the true nature of sex crimes in America” from the prizewinning true crime journalist who is also the author of The Wrong Man: The Final Verdict on the Dr. Sam Sheppard Murder Case and Mobbed Up: Jackie Presser’s High-Wire Life in the Teamsters, the Mafia, and the FBI, which was the basis for the HBO movie, Teamster Boss (Nicholas Pileggi).  
    Show book
  • The Red Ripper - Inside the Mind of Russia's Most Brutal Serial Killer - cover

    The Red Ripper - Inside the Mind...

    Peter Conrad

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    The shocking true story of the Russian serial killer who brutally murdered more than fifty victims—and evaded capture for over a decade. By the time he was brought to trial in 1992, Soviet serial killer Andrei Chikatilo had killed more than fifty women and children, often sexually abusing them and leaving their bodies mutilated beyond recognition. Although he was initially arrested in 1984, the police lacked enough evidence to pin the unsolved murders on him and he was able to torture and kill dozens more before his eventual conviction. Compiling exclusive interviews and trial transcripts, journalist and editor at London’s Sunday Times Peter Conradi reveals how the grandfather and former teacher carried out a horrific twelve-year killing spree right under the nose of authority.   Based on extensive research into Chikatilo’s past and the elements of Soviet society that allowed his crimes to go unsolved for so long, Conradi delves into the life of one of history’s most prolific and disturbing serial killers. Interviews with Moscow police detectives detail the fervent hunt for the man who preyed on young children, prostitutes, and runaways—a search that turned up many dead ends and false convictions before a massive undercover surveillance effort ultimately nabbed Chikatilo.   A chilling look into the deranged mind of a monster, The Red Ripper is a comprehensive and shocking true crime account—plus photos—of one of the twentieth century’s deadliest killers and the manhunt to catch him.  
    Show book
  • Time - A Vocabulary of the Present - cover

    Time - A Vocabulary of the Present

    Amy Elias, Joel Burges

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    The critical condition and historical motivation behind Time Studies                                                                                            The concept of time in the post-millennial age is undergoing a radical rethinking within the humanities. Time: A Vocabulary of the Present newly theorizes our experiences of time in relation to developments in post-1945 cultural theory and arts practices. Wide ranging and theoretically provocative, the volume introduces readers to cutting-edge temporal conceptualizations and investigates what exactly constitutes the scope of time studies. 
    Featuring twenty essays that reveal what we talk about when we talk about time today, especially in the areas of history, measurement, and culture, each essay pairs two keywords to explore the tension and nuances between them, from “past/future” and  “anticipation/unexpected” to “extinction/adaptation” and “serial/simultaneous.” Moving beyond the truisms of postmodernism, the collection newly theorizes the meanings of temporality in relationship to aesthetic, cultural, technological, and economic developments in the postwar period. This book thus assumes that time—not space, as the postmoderns had it—is central to the contemporary period, and that through it we can come to terms with what contemporaneity can be for human beings caught up in the historical present. In the end, Time reveals that the present is a cultural matrix in which overlapping temporalities condition and compete for our attention. Thus each pair of terms presents two temporalities, yielding a generative account of the time, or times, in which we live.
    Show book
  • Macbeth - cover

    Macbeth

    William Shakespeare, SBP Editors

    • 0
    • 4
    • 0
    Shakespeare's Macbeth is one of the greatest tragic dramas the world has known. Macbeth himself, a brave warrior, is fatally impelled by supernatural forces, by his proud wife, and by his own burgeoning ambition.
    The play is set in Scotland. Returning from battle with his companion Banquo, the nobleman Macbeth meets a group of witches. They predict that Macbeth will first become thane (baron) of Cawdor and then king of Scotland. Urged on by Lady Macbeth, his wife, Macbeth murders King Duncan. But Duncan's sons, Malcolm and Donalbain, escape. Macbeth then seizes the throne of Scotland. But Macbeth has no peace. In a bid to prevent Banquo's descendants from becoming kings according to the witches' prophecy, Macbeth arranges for him to be murdered, along with his son Fleance. Macbeth's men kill Banquo, but Fleance escapes. Haunted by Banquo's ghost, Macbeth seeks counsel from the witches. They tell him to beware of Macduff, another Scottish nobleman. Macbeth is now hardened to killing. He orders the murder of Macduff's wife and children. By contrast, Lady Macbeth, who had encouraged her husband to embark upon his path of slaughter, goes mad with guilt and dies. Macduff's army attacks Macbeth's forces. Macduff meets Macbeth in single combat and kills him. Malcolm, Duncan's son, is then proclaimed king of Scotland. 
    ABOUT THE AUTHOR: 
    William Shakespeare (baptised 26 April 1564) was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the 'Bard of Avon' (or simply "The Bard"). His surviving works consist of 37 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and several other poems. His plays have been translated into every major living language. 
    Shakespeare was born and raised in Stratford-upon-Avon. Scholars believe that he died on his fifty-second birthday, coinciding with St George’s Day. At the age of 18 he married Anne Hathaway, who bore him three children: Susanna, twins Hamnet and Judith. Between 1585 and 1592 he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part owner of the playing company the Lord Chamberlain's Men, later known as the King's Men. He appears to have retired to Stratford around 1613, where he died three years later. 
    Shakespeare produced most of his known work between 1590 and 1613. His early plays were mainly comedies and histories, genres he raised to the peak of sophistication and artistry by the end of the sixteenth century. Next he wrote mainly tragedies until about 1608. He was a respected poet and playwright in his own day, but his reputation did not rise to its present heights until the nineteenth century. The Romantics, in particular, acclaimed Shakespeare's genius, and the Victorians hero-worshipped Shakespeare. In the twentieth century, his work was repeatedly adopted and rediscovered by new movements in scholarship and performance. His plays remain highly popular today and are consistently performed and reinterpreted in diverse cultural and political contexts throughout the world.
    Show book
  • Illiberal Reformers - Race Eugenics and American Economics in the Progressive Era - cover

    Illiberal Reformers - Race...

    Thomas C. Leonard

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    In Illiberal Reformers, Thomas Leonard reexamines the economic progressives whose ideas and reform agenda underwrote the Progressive Era dismantling of laissez-faire and the creation of the regulatory welfare state, which, they believed, would humanize and rationalize industrial capitalism. But not for all. Academic social scientists such as Richard T. Ely, John R. Commons, and Edward A. Ross, together with their reform allies in social work, charity, journalism, and law, played a pivotal role in establishing minimum-wage and maximum-hours laws, workmen's compensation, antitrust regulation, and other hallmarks of the regulatory welfare state. But even as they offered uplift to some, economic progressives advocated exclusion for others, and did both in the name of progress. Leonard meticulously reconstructs the influence of Darwinism, racial science, and eugenics on scholars and activists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, revealing a reform community deeply ambivalent about America's poor. Illiberal Reformers shows that the intellectual champions of the regulatory welfare state proposed using it not to help those they portrayed as hereditary inferiors but to exclude them.
    Show book
  • Life Less Lonely A: What We Can All Do to Lead More Connected Kinder Lives - cover

    Life Less Lonely A: What We Can...

    Nick Duerden

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Loneliness has reached the levels of an epidemic. From the bullied child to the new parent, from the pensioner who has outlived friends and family members to teenagers who manage their social lives through the glow of a mobile phone, it can - and does - affect anyone and everyone, irrespective of age, race or class. Many suffer in silence, convinced it's a confession too far, a sign of too much vulnerability, a shameful failing. But the human condition is not a failing. 
     
    What's it like when loneliness descends? How does it announce itself, and how do you recognise it? Do you discuss it, or conceal it? From where can you seek help? 
     
    A Life Less Lonely shares stories of loneliness and social isolation, and looks for ways in which we can help one another to future-proof ourselves against this most insidious affliction. By talking to those who suffer from it, and by highlighting the work of those who fight to combat it, the book offers guidance on how to spot the symptoms in yourself and in others, how to connect with those around you, and how, by understanding it all better, we might just set ourselves free from it. 
     
    In this way, what is an epidemic today might not be one tomorrow.
    Show book