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The Life and Death of Adolf Hitler - cover

The Life and Death of Adolf Hitler

Robert Payne

Publisher: Endeavour Media

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Summary

Erupting like a force of nature, Adolf Hitler sought to dominate the entire world and reshape it according to his own desires. 

 

Ruthless, calculating and intuitive, the decorated soldier of WWI was a skilled orator, able to seduce the masses as easily as he could manipulate state authority or European leaders. But he was also susceptible to violent rages and possessiveness, which over the course of his life proved testing for any relationship that he formed.  

 

In The Life and Death of Adolf Hitler, Robert Payne explores his public and private life — the living, breathing man — in order to understand how this increasingly isolated figure was able to attain absolute power. 

 

 
Praise for Robert Payne:

 
 

'Probably no author of this century has produced so many books at such a relatively high level of scholarship' — The Times 

 

'Part of the strength of this book is the revelation of how a child of German romantic tradition, thwarted and rejected, became a tyrant.' - Atlantic Monthly  

 

'Payne humanizes the inhuman Hitler ... study of a real flesh-and-blood, power-obsessed man which seems so relevant, so necessary, to our era.' - Los Angeles Times  

 

Robert Payne (1911-1983) was the author of many notable works, including The Rise and Fall of Stalin, The Life and Death of Lenin and The Life and Death of Adolf Hitler. Born in England, he was a constant world traveller, a keen observer, but always the biographer, historian, novelist, poet and translator.

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