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Story - Style Structure Substance and the Principles of Screenwriting - cover

Story - Style Structure Substance and the Principles of Screenwriting

Robert McKee

Publisher: HarperCollins e-books

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Summary

Robert McKee's screenwriting workshops have earned him an international reputation for inspiring novices, refining works in progress and putting major screenwriting careers back on track. Quincy Jones, Diane Keaton, Gloria Steinem, Julia Roberts, John Cleese and David Bowie are just a few of his celebrity alumni.  Writers, producers, development executives and agents all flock to his lecture series, praising it as a mesmerizing and intense learning experience.   
 In Story, McKee expands on the concepts he teaches in his $450 seminars (considered a must by industry insiders), providing readers with the most comprehensive, integrated explanation of the craft of writing for the screen. No one better understands how all the elements of a screenplay fit together, and no one is better qualified to explain the "magic" of story construction and the relationship between structure and character than Robert McKee.

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