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Hit & Run - Daring Air Attacks in World War II - cover

Hit & Run - Daring Air Attacks in World War II

Robert Jackson

Publisher: Pen & Sword Aviation

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Summary

An overview of harrowing World War II air attacks from across the globe. 
 
Hit & Run describes some of the most daring World War II air attacks. Some were outstanding successes while others were unmitigated disasters . . .  
 
North Sea Battle: In the early weeks of World War II, Britain and Germany were determined to attack one another’s warships in their respective naval bases. Both RAF and Luftwaffe learned the folly of sending unescorted bombers into enemy territory. 
 
Flames over France: In May 1940, the RAF and French Air Force launched a series of desperate hit-and-run attacks on the German armoured columns advancing into France and Belgium. The cost was appalling. 
 
Precision Attack: In August 1940, a newly-formed Luftwaffe unit called Erprobungsgruppe 210 (Test Group 210), equipped with bomb-carrying Messerschmitts, was assigned a mission to wipe out British radar stations in a series of lightning low-level attacks. 
 
Carrier Strike: In November 1940, a force of Fairey Swordfish torpedo-bombers crippled the Italian fleet in a daring night attack on the naval base at Taranto. 
 
By Daylight to Germany: In the summer of 1941, Blenheim squadrons of No 2 Group RAF launched a series of daring low-level attacks on power stations and naval facilities in northern Germany. The principal target was Bremen, at the extreme limit of the bombers’ range. 
 
Plus. . . .  
 
Mission to Augsburg * Target Tokyo * Dead on Time * Extreme Danger Mission * The Raid That Failed * The Anniversary Raids * Mosquito Mission * The Luftwaffe’s Last Fling
Available since: 07/19/2005.
Print length: 208 pages.

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