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The Pier-Glass - cover

The Pier-Glass

Robert Graves

Publisher: Good Press

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Summary

Robert Graves' The Pier-Glass is a captivating novel set in the early 20th century, exploring themes of identity, self-discovery, and the impact of the past on the present. The book is written in Graves' signature poetic prose style, blending elements of historical fiction with elements of psychological introspection. As the protagonist delves into his family history through an old pier-glass, readers are taken on a journey through time and memory, questioning the nature of reality and perception. The novel's intricate narrative structure invites readers to ponder the complexities of human experience and the search for truth amidst layers of illusion and truth. The Pier-Glass is a literary gem that showcases Graves' mastery of language and storytelling, making it a must-read for fans of thought-provoking literature and historical fiction.
Available since: 12/03/2019.
Print length: 237 pages.

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