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The Feather Bed - cover

The Feather Bed

Robert Graves

Publisher: Good Press

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Summary

Robert Graves' novel, The Feather Bed, is a captivating exploration of love, loss, and the complexities of human relationships. Set in the backdrop of post-World War I England, the book follows the lives of three siblings who find themselves entangled in a web of secrets and betrayals. Graves' lyrical prose and vivid storytelling transport the reader to a time where societal norms clash with personal desires, creating a tension that drives the narrative forward. The novel's rich character development and intricate plot make it a compelling read for those interested in historical fiction and psychological drama. As one delves deeper into the pages of The Feather Bed, they will find themselves immersed in a world where passion and duty collide, leaving lasting consequences on the characters' lives. Robert Graves, known for his evocative writing style and insightful exploration of human nature, brings his unique perspective to this poignant tale of love and sacrifice. Drawing upon his own experiences and observations of war-torn England, Graves weaves a complex story that challenges readers to reflect on the complexities of love and loyalty. The Feather Bed is a must-read for anyone seeking a thought-provoking novel that delves into the depths of the human soul.
Available since: 11/22/2019.
Print length: 153 pages.

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