Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Loudmouth - A Novel - cover

Loudmouth - A Novel

Robert Duncan

Publisher: Three Rooms Press

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

“Read this book immediately if you like truth, drugs, generation gaps, guitars, and lifelong quests for freedom and kicks.” --Craig Finn, The Hold Steady
 Thomas Ransom, born to a severely dysfunctional southern family transplanted to New York City, is left to his own devices by neglectful parents, and spends his childhood shadowing his criminally-inclined half-brother and roaming the city with hard-drinking teenage pals. He eventually finds an outlet as the flamboyant singer of a downtown rock band, and later as the young editor of the Detroit-based magazine that invented punk, only to return to New York, at the height of the 1970s bacchanal, and crash. But it isn’t music that saves him. It’s a soft-spoken painter, who turns out to be the most outrageous character of all. With echoes of Almost Famous and Just Kids, LOUDMOUTH tracks an impassioned musician and writer out among the punks, hippies, and wild geniuses of rock when music was the center of the world. Author Robert Duncan was barely out of his teens when he started writing for the influential music magazine Creem, becoming its managing editor at 22. He went on to write for Rolling Stone, Circus, Life, and dozens of other publications, interviewing hundreds of rock stars at the top of their game. In the process, Duncan became a rock Zelig: he shares tales of his time with a young, scrawny Bruce Springsteen while driving him around Detroit; he introduces The Clash‘s Mick Jones and Joe Strummer to a broken-down piano player of dubious ability, leading to a hilariously disastrous recording session with the band; he works alongside legendary rock critic Lester Bangs, witnesses his tragic spiral, and finally discovers him dead of an OD in the apartment next door. These experiences, and many others, provide the fuel for his debut novel, LOUDMOUTH, making it what Brian Jonestown Massacre's Joel Gion calls, “A sonic wail of a tale about the youthful beginnings of one of the Mount Rushmore ‘heads’ of rock ’n’ roll journalism.”

Other books that might interest you

  • Prohibition Wine - A True Story of One Woman's Daring in Twentieth-Century America - cover

    Prohibition Wine - A True Story...

    Marian Leah Knapp

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    In 1918, Rebecca Goldberg—a Jewish immigrant from the Russian Empire living in rural Wilmington, Massachusetts—lost her husband, Nathan, to a railroad accident, a tragedy that left her alone with six children to raise. To support the family after Nathan’s death, Rebecca continued work she’d done for years: keeping chickens. Once or twice a week, with a suitcase full of fresh eggs in one hand and a child in the other, she delivered her product to relatives and friends in and around Boston. 
    
    
    
    Then, in 1920—right at the start of Prohibition—one of Rebecca’s customers suggested that she start selling alcoholic beverages in addition to her eggs to add to her meagre income. He would provide his homemade raw alcohol; Rebecca would turn it into something drinkable and sell it to new customers in Wilmington. Desperate to feed her family and keep them together, and determined to make sure her kids would all graduate from high school, Rebecca agreed—making herself a wary participant in the illegal alcohol trade. 
    
    
    
    Rebecca’s business grew slowly and surreptitiously until 1925, when she was caught and summoned to appear before a judge. Fortunately for her, the chief of police was one of her customers, and when he spoke highly of her character before the court, all charges were dropped. Her case made headline news—and she made history.
    Show book
  • Be Straight with Me - cover

    Be Straight with Me

    Emily Dalton

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Be Straight with Me is an unforgettable memoir-in-verse about a love that blurs the boundaries of gender and sexuality—told from the perspective of a young, straight woman who finds herself in a serious relationship with her gay male best friend. With unabashed honesty and piercing emotional clarity, Emily Dalton brings to life this timely, true story about a nonconforming romance and its consequences.During her sophomore year at Middlebury College, Emily meets Max—“you” as she intimately refers to him in the book. Not exactly a tomboy, but not quite a girly girl either, Emily is intent on finding a masculine boyfriend to assuage a deeply rooted fear that she may not be quite feminine enough. Max—a boisterous class clown beloved by his many straight guy friends—has recently come out as gay and is embracing his newly claimed identity. Initially, Max and Emily dislike each other, but end up growing close after a make-out dare on Halloween. Then one night, Max reveals an unexpected physical attraction that catches them both by surprise. The relationship begins, playfully and in secret, and then spirals into something more. Max and Emily’s journey takes many forms—they experiment with drugs; they travel abroad; they try sleeping with other people (together), and everything in between—all in the name of “this bizarre, beautiful thing” they call love. 
    Show book
  • The Rider - cover

    The Rider

    Tim Krabbé

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    The instant cult classic about biking, road racing, and the bicyclists who love their sport.  
     
    Originally published in Holland in 1978, The Rider went on to sell more than 100,000 copies. Brilliantly conceived and written at a break-neck pace, it is a loving, imaginative, and, above all, passionate tribute to the art of bicycle road racing.  
     
    Tim Krabbé begins this story at the very start of the Tour de Mont Aigoual, ready to race his rivals through the mountains of Central France. Over the course of the 150 pages that follows, Krabbé takes his bike 150 kilometers, and pulls his readers into the life of the sport he loves.  
     
    The Rider is beloved as a bicycle odyssey, a literary masterpiece, and the ultimate book for bike lovers as well as the arm-chair sports enthusiast.
    Show book
  • Norma Jean - The Life of Marilyn Monroe - cover

    Norma Jean - The Life of Marilyn...

    Fred Lawrence Guiles

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Celebrity Biographer: New York Times bestselling author Fred Lawrence Guiles is considered the premier biographer of hollywood movie stars.
     
    Old Hollywood Charm: Lovers of classic movies and the golden age of cinema will rush to get their hands on the definitive biographies of these universally loved celebrities.
     
    Repackaged Glam: The coordinating modern covers breathe life into these classic figures and will be a stunning addition to any hollywood-lover’s bookshelf.
     
    Exclusive Pictures and Interviews: Each biography contain previously unpublished photographs and interviews that enhance the fascinating and nuanced lives of these famous celebrities.
    Show book
  • Pondlife - A Swimmer's Journal - cover

    Pondlife - A Swimmer's Journal

    Al Alvarez

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The  ponds of Hampstead Heath are small oases; fragments of wild nature  nestled in the heart of north-west London. For the best part of his life  Al Alvarez – poet, critic, novelist, rock-climber and poker player –  has swum in them almost daily.  
     
    An athlete in his youth, Alvarez,  now in his eighties, chronicles what it is to grow old with humour and  fierce honesty – from his relentlessly nagging ankle which makes daily  life a struggle, to infuriating bureaucratic battles with the council to  keep his disabled person's Blue Badge, the devastating effects of a  stroke, and the salvation he finds in the three Ss – Swimming, Sex and  Sleep. 
     
    As Alvarez swims in the ponds he considers how it feels  when you begin to miss that person you used to be – to miss yourself.  Swimming is his own private form of protest against the onslaught of  time; proof to others, and himself, that he's not yet beaten.  
     
    By turns funny, poetic and indignant, Pondlife  is a meditation on love, the importance of life's small pleasures and,  above all, a lesson in not going gently in to that good night.
    Show book
  • Permanent Damage - Memoirs of an Outrageous Girl - cover

    Permanent Damage - Memoirs of an...

    Mercy Fontenot

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Miss Mercy was one of the members of the all-female, Frank Zappa-produced, 1960s band The GTOs, alongside Pamela Des BarresLyndsey Parker a music editor at Yahoo Entertainment, and hosts multiple shows on Sirius XMRolling Stone did a big article about Miss Mercy when she died in July of 2020, there were also features about her in LA Weekly, NME, The Independent, and moreThe GTOs were highly influential despite only being together for 2 1/2 years
    Show book