Subscribe and enjoy more than 1 million books
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced 7236434c7af12f85357591f712aa5cce47c3d377e8addfc98f989c55a4ef4ca5
Pippa Passes - "What I aspired to be and was not comforts me" - cover

Pippa Passes - "What I aspired to be and was not comforts me"

Robert Browning

Publisher: Stage Door

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Robert Browning is one of the most significant Victorian Poets and, of course, English Poetry. 
Much of his reputation is based upon his mastery of the dramatic monologue although his talents encompassed verse plays and even a well-regarded essay on Shelley during a long and prolific career.  
He was born on May 7th, 1812 in Walmouth, London.  Much of his education was home based and Browning was an eclectic and studious student, learning several languages and much else across a myriad of subjects, interests and passions.  
Browning's early career began promisingly. The fragment from his intended long poem Pauline brought him to the attention of Dante Gabriel Rossetti, and was followed by Paracelsus, which was praised by both William Wordsworth and Charles Dickens. In 1840 the difficult Sordello, which was seen as willfully obscure, brought his career almost to a standstill.  
Despite these artistic and professional difficulties his personal life was about to become immensely fulfilling.  He began a relationship with, and then married, the older and better known Elizabeth Barrett. This new foundation served to energise his writings, his life and his career.  
During their time in Italy they both wrote much of their best work. With her untimely death in 1861 he returned to London and thereafter began several further major projects.  
The collection Dramatis Personae (1864) and the book-length epic poem The Ring and the Book (1868-69) were published and well received; his reputation as a venerated English poet now assured.  
Robert Browning died in Venice on December 12th, 1889.

Other books that might interest you

  • Homecoming - cover

    Homecoming

    Heather Inc. Justesen

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    Alanna is surprised by the return of her step-brother and former lover, Kyle, when he shows up to work at the newspaper she writes for as the new head photographer. Unbeknownst to him, they have a daughter from the night before they last saw each other eight years previous. Can they forgive each other and rekindle the trust and love they once shared?
    Show book
  • The Poetry of May Sarton Volume One - Letters from Maine Inner Landscape and Halfway to Silence - cover

    The Poetry of May Sarton Volume...

    May Sarton

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Three celebrated volumes of verse from a feminist icon, poet, and author of the groundbreaking novel Mrs. Stevens Hears the Mermaids Singing.  Letters from Maine: A rugged coastline provides a stark background for Sarton’s images of a tragically brief love. With vulnerability and emotional depth, she explores the willingness to devote everything to a new love, as well as the despair at the memory of what is left over when it fades.  Inner Landscape: This collection of May Sarton’s poems displays her inimitable mix of stately verse and depth of feeling that lurks beneath every line, creating a tantalizing, magnetically charged distance between reader and poet.  Halfway to Silence: After decades of writing flowing lyric verse, May Sarton’s style turned to short, vibrant bursts of poetry. These condensed poems are rife with exuberant impressions of nature and of love, including two of her most acclaimed works, “Old Lovers at the Ballet” and “Of the Muse.”   Recognized as a true pioneer in lesbian literature, “Sarton’s poems enter and illuminate every natural corner of our lives. . . . So strong in their faith and in their positive response to the human condition that they will outlast much of the fashionable, cynical poetry of our ear” (James Martin).  
    Show book
  • Love and Tai Chi - cover

    Love and Tai Chi

    Karen Glotzer

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The practice of tai chi is an embodiment of poetry, with its peaceful, balanced forms. Karen Glotzer, who is both a poet and a tai chi instructor, compares it to moving through gentle water, lifting off  the ground like a bird in flight, or standing like a tree with the wind gently blowing through its leaves.
    
    Through poetry, Love and Tai Chi relates the philosophy of tai chi to many different aspects of human existence. It provides simple explanations about the multiple benefits of the art, one that few Westerners are familiar with, despite the fact that it is lauded by Harvard Medical School for its meditative and health aspects. Glotzer also applies the yin and yang theory of opposites upon which tai chi is based toward a variety of subjects. These verses consider romantic love, animals, nature, life, death, and friendship, all through the lens of tai chi.
    
    This collection of poetry seeks to express in verse the feelings experienced in tai chi—what it feels like to walk upon clouds, move like water, take root like a tree, or fly like a crane.
    Show book
  • Black Queer Hoe - cover

    Black Queer Hoe

    Britteney Black Rose Kapri

    • 0
    • 3
    • 0
    Black Queer Hoe is a refreshing, unapologetic intervention into ongoing conversations about the line between sexual freedom and sexual exploitation. 
    Women’s sexuality is often used as a weapon against them. In this powerful debut, Britteney Black Rose Kapri lends her unmistakable voice to fraught questions of identity, sexuality, reclamation, and power, in a world that refuses Black Queer women permission to define their own lives and boundaries. 
    Britteney Black Rose Kapri is a Chicago performance  poet and playwright. Currently she is an alumna turned Teaching Artist Fellow at Young Chicago Authors. Her work has been featured in Poetry Magazine,  Button Poetry, Seven Scribes, and many other outlets, and anthologized in The BreakBeat Poets and The BreakBeat Poets Vol. 2: Black Girl Magic. She is a contributor to Black Nerd Problems, a Pink Door Retreat Fellow, and a 2015 Rona Jaffe Writers Award Recipient.
    Show book
  • All the Queen's Men - cover

    All the Queen's Men

    Linda Howard

    • 1
    • 5
    • 0
    It was cold in the rough little hut. Despite the blankets hung over the one window and the ill-fitting door, to block the escape of any telltale light, frigid air still seeped through. Niema Burdock blew on her fingers to warm them, her breath fogging slightly in the one dim battery-operated light that was all Tucker, the team leader, allowed. 
    Her husband, Dallas, seemed perfectly comfortable in his T-shirt as he calmly packed the Semtex blocks into secure sections of his web gear. Niema watched him, trying to hide her anxiety. It wasn't the explosive she worried about; plastique was so stable soldiers in Vietnam had burned it as fuel. But Dallas and Sayyed had to plant the explosives in the manufacturing facility, and that was the most dangerous part of a job that was already hair-raising enough. Though her husband was as matter-of-fact about it as he would be about crossing the street, Niema wasn't that blase about the job. The radio detonator wasn't state-of-the art; far from it. This was deliberate, a precaution in case any of their equipment fell into the wrong hands. Nothing they were using could be traced to the United States, which was why Dallas was using Semtex instead of C-4. But because their equipment wasn't the best available, Niema had gone to great pains to make sure it was reliable. It was her husband's finger, after all, that would be on the switch. 
    Dallas caught her gaze on him and winked at her, his strong face relaxing from its normal impassiveness into a warm smile that he reserved only for her. "Hey," he said mildly, "I'm good at this. Don't worry." 
    So much for trying to hide her anxiety. The other three men turned to look at her. Not wanting them to think she couldn't handle the stress of the job, she shrugged. "So sue me. I'm new at this wife business. I thought I was supposed to worry." 
    Sayyed laughed as he packed his own gear. "Heck of a way to spend your honeymoon." He was a native Iranian who was now an American citizen, a tough, wiry man in his late forties. He spoke English with a Midwestern accent, the result of both hard work and almost thirty years in the United States. "Personally, I'd have picked Hawaii for my wedding trip. At least it would be warm there." 
    "Or Australia," Hadi said wistfully. "It's summer there now." Hadi Santana was of Arabic and Mexican heritage, but an American by birth. He had grown up in the heat of southern Arizona and didn't like the cold Iranian mountains in mid-winter any better than did Niema. He would stand guard while Dallas and Sayyed planted the charges and was occupying himself by checking and rechecking his rifle and ammunition. 
    "We spent two weeks in Aruba after we got married," Dallas said. "Great place." He winked at Niema again, and she had to smile. Unless Dallas had been to Aruba another time, he hadn't seen much of it during their honeymoon, three months before. They had spent the entire two weeks lost in each other's company, making love, sleeping late. Bliss.
    Show book
  • She Felt Like Feeling Nothing - cover

    She Felt Like Feeling Nothing

    r.h. Sin

    • 8
    • 173
    • 0
    There are moments when the heart no longer wishes to feel because everything it's felt up until then has brought it nothing but anguish. In She Felt Like Feeling Nothing, r.h. Sin pursues themes of self-discovery and retrospection. With this book, the poet intends to create a safe space where women can rest their weary hearts and focus on themselves.
    Show book