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Japan Traveler's Companion - Japan's Most Famous Sights From Okinawa to Hokkaido - cover

Japan Traveler's Companion - Japan's Most Famous Sights From Okinawa to Hokkaido

Rob Goss

Publisher: Tuttle Publishing

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Summary

Japan mesmerizes and bewilders the visitor in equal measure, making a top-notch travel guide essential for anyone planning a trip to the land of the rising sun. Rob Goss is an award-winning Japan travel writer who has lived in the country for years. From fast-paced Tokyo to the serene temples and gardens of Kyoto to the booming winter resort of Niseko, Goss shows visitors where to experience the country's rich culinary traditions, pop culture, Samurai heritage, and so much more. Delving beyond the scope of traditional guidebooks, Japan Traveler's Companion showcases the insider's Japan, offering detailed itineraries for each region as well as:  Information on the country's 100 most important tourist sights, including 22 UNESCO World Heritage Sites Illustrated introductions to Japanese cuisine, popular culture, and Samurai history A map of each region with suggested walks Tips for getting off the beaten path and finding Japan's lesser-known treasures, such as the contemporary "art island" of Naoshim and Yakushima's breathtaking flora and fauna Engagingly written and richly illustrated with hundreds of color photos, this Japan travel guide is the one book visitors will keep by their side before, during, and long after they complete their journey.

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