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Learn Spanish for Beginners - Easy Step-by-Step Method to Start Learning Spanish Today - cover

Learn Spanish for Beginners - Easy Step-by-Step Method to Start Learning Spanish Today

R.M. Lewis

Publisher: R&C Publishing

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Summary

FINALLY you are going to learn a 2nd language like you've always told yourself you would!

 
There is no better place to start than the Spanish Beginner's Guide by Discover Language. This guide offers a comprehensive approach to the basics of the Spanish language. Learn Spanish for Beginners is a book for all kinds of learners, whether you are particularly interested in rules and spelling, or if you are trying to build on your vocabulary, this guide covers all of it.

 
In this book you'll learn…

 
•    ALL the beginner level vocabulary there is to know•    Basic greetings and other common Spanish expressions•    Past, present and future tense of verbs•    10 different types of pronouns and when/how to use them•    Rules for correct spelling and punctuation•    And Much More!

 
Spanish is a beautiful language to learn and the 3rd most widely spoken language in the world. Learn Spanish for Beginners is a very good way to start learning because it highlights the often difficult parts of learning a new language and explains it so it can be understood more easily. We do our best by presenting all of the highly important details so the reader can best comprehends what he/she is doing.

 
Audiobook is highly recommended as the most effective way of learning a new language.

 
With almost half a billion (and growing) Spanish speakers in the world, there is no better time than right now to learn Spanish.

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