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Play great guitar - Brilliant ideas for getting more out of your six-string - cover

Play great guitar - Brilliant ideas for getting more out of your six-string

Rikky Rooksby

Publisher: Infinite Ideas

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Summary

Knowing how to play the guitar is just one of those things we’d all love to be able to do. Think back to your formative years - at parties it was always the kid with the guitar who got all the attention, and it's probably that same kid who is now raking it in with their uber-cool band while you slave away at your desk. Now your dreams of guitar-playing stardom* can come a little closer to reality with the help of our fantastic new book Play great guitar. Packed with expert advice for getting more out of your hobby, plus over 25 original compositions to try yourself, Play great guitar is guaranteed to give you plenty of inspiring ideas and more practical skills so you can improve your playing and enjoy your guitar even more. You don’t even need to be able to read sheet music, as all compositions also include full chord notation for ease of playing. Ideal for those just starting out, as well as more experienced players, Play great guitar has something for everyone, whatever your musical tastes. Simply brilliant.
Available since: 11/03/2014.

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