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Soar Adam Soar - cover

Soar Adam Soar

Rick Prashaw

Publisher: Dundurn

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Summary

The moving true story of a transgender man’s life, told through his social media posts and in the words of his father, a priest-turned-dad
Adam, born Rebecca, had identified as a man and been transitioning for years before he died in a tragic accident, leaving behind unfinished stories his father retells, using his son’s words as much as possible
Details the highs and lows of Adam’s bumpy life — being assigned female at birth, questioning first his sexuality and then his gender, and struggling with epilepsy, all while living with a disarming intensity and directness
A story in which the parents and loved ones of transgender people may see a little of themselves, and which centres the authenticity of Adam’s own experience
Told with sensitivity, compassion, and candour. Author strives to represent Adam as his son would have represented himself

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